cameron


Bruce Cameron

Professor and Department Head

Address:
129 Human Ecology

Email Address:
bcameron1@lsu.edu

Office Phone:
225-578-2282

College:
College of Agriculture

Department:
Department of Textiles, Apparel Design and Merchandising

 

Research Interests

My research interests include the scholarship of teachings (in particular student and faculty perceptions of social activities/interactions in group situations in online classes), laundering with commercial laundry detergents, and the clean color of U.S. wool.  Recently, my research has included:

  • Are interpersonal relationships necessary for developing trust in online group projects?
  • How do students define their roles and responsibilities in online learning group projects?
  • Detergent considerations for consumers:  Laundering in hard water – How much extra detergent is required?
  • The yellowing propensity of Rambouillet wool.

My teaching and graduate education interests overlap with my research interests and focus on educating students with the Design, Merchandising and Textiles program option.  I currently accept masters students in the Family and Consumer Sciences graduate program.  All graduate students must have a sincere interest in conducting research that coincides with my research interests.

Further information on my Education; Professional Experience, Professional Memberships; Courses Taught and Peer Reviewed Publications can be found below.

Are interpersonal relationships necessary for developing trust in online group projects?

rust between group members has been suggested as an important part of small group work in online classrooms. Developing interpersonal relationships with group members may promote a sense of trust among them; however, research shows mixed results. The current study explored how students’ perceptions of the importance of interpersonal relationships in online groups affected their perceptions of trust and experiences within the group. Students enrolled in online classes that incorporated a group project were surveyed about their experiences with online group projects. Participants did not find interpersonal relationships as necessary in trust development. However, student gender and type (i.e., distance versus on-campus) were important factors in determining the type of experiences students had within their online groups. Males reported more negative experiences than females, and distance education students desired relationships with group members more than on-campus students.


How do students define their roles and responsibilities in online learning group projects?

The goal of this study was to explore the processes of group role formation in online class settings. Qualitative analysis was used to code chat logs and discussion threads in six undergraduate Family and Consumer Sciences online courses that required online group projects. Four themes related to the process of group role formation emerged: testing the waters, apologies as being nice, tag – you’re it, and struggling to find one’s role. Students created roles of leader, wannabe, spoiler, agreeable enabler, coat‐tails, and supportive worker as the group process evolved over the course of the semester. Results lend support for a balance between allowing students to create and experience roles on their own and faculty assignment of roles. Questions are raised related to faculty approaches toward directing and scaffolding the group process.


Detergent considerations for consumers:  Laundering in hard water – how much extra detergent is required?

Laundering is a complex process, and detergents have changed considerably over the last 20 years. The research reported will be of benefit to both Extension educators and teachers in advising people with whom they work on choices between different types of laundry detergents when it comes to laundering. Liquid detergents washed equally well in both soft and hard water. Powdered detergents were better than liquids in soft water. Water hardness affected powdered detergents, and, depending on the detergent type, 10-15% to > 30% extra detergent was needed to obtain a result similar to that of soft water.


The yellowing propensity of Rambouillet wool.

The yellowing propensity of Rambouillet wool was evaluated. One hundred greasy side samples of Rambouillet ewes were collected in the spring of 2007, and 142 greasy side samples were collected from Rambouillet rams during the October 2006 Ram test. The propensity to develop yellow discoloration was determined on each of the greasy wool samples. After scouring, average-fiber diameters were obtained. Absorbance measurements of supernatant liquids clearly indicated there was a wide range in yellowing propensity for both the rams and the ewes. This would imply that is would be possible to include yellowing propensity in a selection program, allowing producers to discriminate against those animals with a propensity to develop yellow discoloration. There was no significant difference between the yellowing propensity of the ram or ewe wool and fiber diameter.

 

Education

  • Ph.D. Textile Technology – University of New South Wales, Australia, 1986
  • B.Sc. Honors Class I, Textile Technology, University of New South Wales, Australia, 1983

 

Professional Experience

  • Professor and Department Head, Louisiana State University, 2018- 
  • Professor and Department Head, University of Wyoming, 2017-2018
  • Associate Professor and Department Head, University of Wyoming, 2012-2017
  • Associate Professor, University of Wyoming, 1997 -2012
  • Assistant Professor, University of Wyoming, 1992-1997
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Wyoming, 1986-1992
  • Professional Officer, University of New South Wales, 1986

 

Professional Memberships

  • International Textile and Apparel Association
  • Textile Institute
  • American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists
  • American Chemical Society

Publications

2016

Wade, Christine, E., Cameron, Bruce A., Morgan, Kari and Williams, Karen C.  “Key Components of Online Group Projects:  Faculty Perceptions”, Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 17, (1), 33-41.

2014

Morgan, Kari, Williams, Karen C., Cameron, Bruce A. and Wade, Christine E.  “Faculty perceptions of online group work”, Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 15 (4) 37-41.

2012

Williams, Karen C., Cameron, Bruce A. and Morgan, Kari.  “Supporting Online Group Projects”, National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture Journal, 56 (2), 15-20.

2011

Cameron, Bruce A.  “Detergent considerations for consumers: Laundering in hard water – how much extra detergent is required?”, Journal of Extension, 49 (4), http://www.joe.org/joe/2011august/rb6.php

Williams, Karen C., Morgan Kari and Cameron, Bruce A. “How do students define their roles and responsibilities in online learning group projects?”, Distance Education, 32 (1), 49-62

Wade, Christine E., Cameron, Bruce A., Morgan, Kari and Williams, Karen C. “Online group projects: Are interpersonal relationships necessary for developing trust?”, Distance Education, 32 (3), 383-396